Global Bloggers: An introduction

Published on 20th December, 2009 in Global Bloggers by Matt Kay

Global-globeWith a course title of Global, we always wanted this blog to have a global voice. To this end one of the blog strands on this site, Global Bloggers, will be written by practicing language teachers and teacher trainers around the world.

Over the coming year the Global Bloggers will be presenting a slice of life in some very different situations. Each Global Blogger will be with us for two months, talking about the state of global English and language education where they are – whether that’s Switzerland or Saudi Arabia, Peru or Portugal.

9 Comments

  • Teaching English in a private language school here in New Zealand, there is sometimes a sense that we can become a little isolated from the rest of the world and what is going on in the profession. We are also stuck in a slight void between teaching British English, with many American English influences and with very few real ‘Kiwi’ materials available.

    Richard Ashmore on 14 January, 2010
  • Hi Richard, thanks for the comment. Yes, I suppose the Kiwi treatment in materials deals mostly with Lord of the Rings film sets and such. I think, in fact, that one of our Global bloggers is based in New Zealand actually so hopefully will do a bit to redress that balance. Thanks for stopping by!

    Lindsay Clandfield on 14 January, 2010
  • I can’t wait for Global English,in Argentina my students are demanding, dedicated and always hungry for new course books,they love British English, so now with a Global touch! what more can they want? I just hope it comes to Argentina Quickly!! please!!

    Chrissie Roch on 14 January, 2010
  • I would be most interested to know what you have based your pronunciation syllabus on. Possibly Jenkin’s Lingua Franca Core given the global nature of this programme? Are you aiming to encourage learners to approximate the speech of native speakers or achieve mutual intelligibility?

    Lisa Field on 14 January, 2010
  • How exciting! I am already subscribing to this blog. I love reading about educators from around the world. Although, the guest writer may have already been selected, here are 3 series that have some wonderful posts where bloggers from around the world have contributed:
    http://teacherbootcamp.edublogs.org/category/investigating-global-edtech-issues/page/2/

    http://www.teachingvillage.org/category/stories-from-the-front-lines-of-efl/

    http://kenwilsonelt.wordpress.com/2009/12/11/guest-post-1-a-polish-dinner-party-in-brazil/

    Shelly Terrell on 15 January, 2010
  • I am looking forward to this series! I love reading about the experiences of teachers around the world!

    Shelly Terrell on 15 January, 2010
  • Thanks for the comments. In answer to your question Chrissie we did base, in part, our pronunciation syllabus on the Lingua Franca core. The way that is implemented will depend in large part more on the teacher and his/her tolerance for errors in pronunciation class (a point emphasized by Jenkins).

    Lindsay Clandfield on 15 January, 2010
  • Also, the overt focus on English from non-native speakers in the Global Voices section and the guidance in the teacher’s books does encourage very much a “mutual intelligibility” approach to pronunciation goals. Those wishing to go further can, of course, do so.

    Lindsay Clandfield on 15 January, 2010
  • Working independently in France teaching business and general English for many years now and mostly create my own coursework because it’s not easy finding books that suit my needs. Global sounds promising! I’m looking forward to ‘la suite’.

    Shani Wilde on 29 January, 2010